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] >> bob samuels -- this working? bob samuels from "the washington post." this is for admiral mullen. i think the proposals of the administration are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000 and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there is much speculation that further cuts in the pentagon budget would lead to additional cuts in the both the army and the marines. if the united states was put in the position where it had to occupy and protect the oil fields of the persian gulf for an extended period of time, say five, six years, are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the, one of the reasons i at least was able to get through the tour as chairman is try not to speculate too much on hypotheticals. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now -- i think they're in the '13 budget, so basically they've been on the hill, the beginnings of them, they've been on the hill for the better part of a year, and they are reductions both the chiefs of those two services and the chairman all support. clearly -- and i did as well when i was chairman over a
from scott and let's go to bob. >> i want to comment, getting players engage is very important. i got to be careful but the three pilot programs, one of the aspect that was really beneficial is nfl alumni players came out and they were genuinely presenting their feelings about the game and talking openly to parents, in northern virginia, made a real difference and one of the points you made is how we come together, and the science and medical industry that we have to embrace that and act accordingly but i am pleased with the players association and the nfl and encouraging their players to come out and engage parents to talk about what is going on and parents are asking hard questions but in the end you want to be informed demand there is a movement. there are steps being taken to try to address this complex issue and the conversation will continue but they are definitely engaging. >> this conversation started with the idea of 14 and under so i will give you the comment. >> thanks very much. let me wrap quickly by saying what i started with, it is great that all of us understand no bra
heroic things during that war. and it also has the support of former senate majority leader bob dole, certainly a patriot. senator dole, a disabled veteran from world war ii, who led the fight to pass the treaty, was here yesterday urging republicans to support it. now, mr. president, think about that. robert dole, who was grievously injured in world war ii, spent more than two years in a hospital, he came to this senate floor, and the first speech he gave was on disabilities, and we needed to do something about it. he was here -- he led the fight to pass the treaty, urging republicans to support it. a few republicans greeted him as he was in his wheelchair here. they greeted this 89-year-old war hero, i repeat, patriot, who just last week was in walter reed hospital. then one by one, all but a handful of them voted against the treaty, ensuring its failure. but their professed reasons for opposing it had no basis in fact -- none. most republicans acknowledge that. some use an excuse, well, it is a lame duck. we shouldn't be doing it in a lame duck. i mean, wow ... and there's no just
, into the treasury and funds development in eastern congo. bob hormats, undersecretary of state in the administration could be a kind of person who could help spearhead that, as someone who has helped build this public-private alliance that involves companies and the united states government and civil society, trying to help us promote responsible investment, spurred on by 1502 from the dodd-frank law. conclusion, my bottom one is this, two sentences. a credible internationally driven peace process that deals with the root causes and includes broader eastern congo civil society, both absolute to guarantee peace, but its absence, however, absolutely guarantees war. thank you very much. >> thank you very much indeed. mr. dizolele? >> chairman smith, ranking member bass, thank you for the invitation to testify before your committee. i come before you as a congolese and u.s. consensus and. the views expressed today, the statements are mine and mine alone. this important hearing comes as yet another critical time for the democratic republic of congo, and i'd like to commend you for your interest in my hom
other countries. that's why bob dole and captain dan pe berzynski want us to appe this treaty. i've heard nothing from the other side that outweighs the reality of that consideration for persons, not just veterans, all persons with disabilities. what's really at stake here is big. the outcome here will not, despite the fear, it's not going to change one election here in the senate. it's not going to decide one of the primaries that i fear are distorting the politics of our country. but you know what, mr. president? it will decide whether some people live or die in another country, where there is no accountability and only united states values and standards are the difference to the prospects of someone with a disability. in some countries, children are disposed of, killed because they have a disability. our treaty can actually help prevent that. in some countries, children do not get to go to school and certainly have no prospects of a future simply because they are born with a disability. this treaty will help offer hope where there is none. the united states could actually sit
to several ways but what if that not so? would've governor bob, president elect romney decides it's not how he wishes to govern wallcovering and the motive is first 22 years when he was governor of massachusetts. they uniformly said they be disappointed and one of the stars at the tea party freshman class he's teaching them about says it will be an insurrection. people seemed generally boisterous. you say nothing at. the president promised us not behave like a conservative, it's going to be the death of the republican party, but were going to burn it down. >> and is going to let that sit there for a second, but that's the great and am then asked the next question. let's come back to the leadership. specifically as individuals in a threesome with a do or do not work together, boehner, cantor and mccarthy. characteristic uninsured and beginning the speaker boehner. >> john boehner is a washington my friend was not obvious choice to leave the tea party class. nonetheless he could be the tea party phenomenon for the freight train that was then elected to be on the train rather than underneath i
-night. >> not really. >> is bob still here? what would you like to ask senator rubio? [laughter] >> are you still doing this shit? [laughter] spent ask him a real question. i decline. [laughter] >> okay. last night talked about a new direction. one of the things that you talk about is -- [inaudible] and how to mike higher education in how to reform programs be the number one thing you would do, you can do as a freshman minority speakers i don't think there's a number one thing. there's a number of things. we got to get them all. the biggest obstacle we face in the 21st century doesn't look like the 21st century. not just in a jewel to graduate high school. still continues to be a significant part of folks that are going into college but it's also the 38 year old who decided to go back to school and get a degree. that was my sister. it's also the 25 year old that's after 10 years of being out of high school has been stuck in a service area jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves to that greatness is that technological advance our not only going to lower the time and costs of getting that kind
up to the mid 30s. ronald reagan brought it up to the mid 30s. bob dole in the midst of the anti-immigrant sentiment of the 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the magic 40% that karl rove thought was the jumping-off point for neutralizing all these questions. so, you know, how -- we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here. so if you, you know, a 10% shift in latino votes, moving a million two, million three, you know, the actual -- what the turnout is we don't really know yet. it's going the take a while. the exit poll numbers are losing credibility as time goes on, but that's -- i don't want to get too -- >> john king. >> geeky with you. yeah. [laughter] but the shift of a million voters, million and a half voters and romney would have been in the mid 30s in terms of his share. and everybody would have said that was a pretty good night for a republican. now, what would have happened in terms of actual states, i knew you were going to ask -- [laughter] >> and then i want to go down the row to get everyone. >> it's interesting, because it d
by a republican -- by a republican majority leader. senator bob dole was the first one to use the first so-called filling the tree. used it seven times. senator byrd, who never used it, that gag rule to stop the minority from offering amendments, i guess, was disappointed he hadn't thought of it so he found a way to use it three times as he was the majority leader. senator mitchell used it three times, senator lott 11, senator daschle only once this gag rule, senator frist 15. all of those leaders used it 40 times. our majority leader, senator reid has used it 68. so we can all come up with statistics on both sides, but shouldn't we just resolve that what we would like to do, show the country that we're grown-up, responsible adults and we can sit down and say, yes, we can agree on ways to make sure that most bills come to the floor and senators get to offer most of the amendments that they want to offer on the bill? i think we can do that. i think there's a spirit on both sides of the aisle to do that, and i'm working toward that goal, and i know a number of democrats and republicans are d
bob barnett, who is the agent of senators and house members who write books and also cab net members and presidents, and we said -- and also cabinet members and presidents. and we said, you know, we'd like to get together and write a book and h we immediately got togethr and wrote a book. and she got a writer who went to each of us and interviewed us and wrote our stories, which were in our own words, and we got together and decided to give all of the proceeds to the girl scouts of america, which was a common organization that had affected almost every one of the women at the time. girl scouts giving leadership capabilities to the girls in our country and i've been a girl scout, barb had been a girl scout. so our book is still in print, and it has raised tens of thousands -- if not hundreds of thousands -- of dollars for the girl scouts to continue their leadership programs. and it all came from something that we learned about each other. and i think that the multiple myeloma, which my brother has and which geraldine fe ferraro , was another area in which barbara and i boun bonded, a
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10